Parenting

Every Picture Tells A Story

Every Picture Tells A Story

Aside from your child’s talent and tenacity, a headshot is one of the most important components in any actor’s career. Agents and casting directors see them by the hundreds on a daily basis, so you naturally want one that stands out. Competition is fierce, and you only have a few seconds to make an impression. The trick is getting a photo that captures your personality (or type) and presents you in a natural and professional manner. This is all easier said than done, but there are strategies for getting the headshot that tells your story perfectly.

Are You Social Media Savvy?

For child actors working to launch their careers (and the parents who support them), building awareness outside of auditions can be one of the greatest challenges in their fledgling professional lives. Luckily, there’s an inexpensive yet potentially powerful marketing tool at your disposal that can help you connect with entertainment industry professionals and keep your young performer in their spotlights whether they’re auditioning for them or not: social media.

Parents of Child Actors Embrace "Best Supporting Role"

For parents of young performers, there’s often so much focus on the child landing or perfecting the big part that they find themselves struggling to find their own place in the process. A strong family support system is an important part of every young actor’s path to success, so you need to begin with an honest assessment of what is behind the pursuit of a career in show business. Assuming you’re in it for your child’s sake and not driven by a misguided personal need, there are two basic schools of thought concerning a parent’s role in show business.

Industry Voices

In the first part of our interview with Steven, he discussed the personal challenges he faced when becoming a stage parent, the importance of understanding child labor laws, and why child actors should be the ones who define their success. In part two, Steven debunks the stereotype of the overbearing stage parent and highlights the essential role parents should play as partners in their young performer’s career. 

Industry Voices

Sally Gaglini has spent more than twenty-five years as a legal advisor for young performers and the companies for whom they work. Her commitment to child actors runs deep, as founder of the Gaglini Law Group, as an entertainment law teacher at Suffolk University, and in her work with lawmakers in creating the inaugural child performer law in Massachusetts. 

Industry Voices

In the first part one of our interview with Angela J. Williams, she recounted her sons’ early successes and the journey that led her to write My Child is Going to Be Rich and Famous. In part two, Angela looks at how show business stacks up to more traditional pursuits and offers suggestions for personal and professional support systems for young actors and their families.

Industry Voices

Since we began in 1982, On Location Education (OLE) has been dedicated to helping young actors balance the demands of their careers and education. You could say balance in all things is something of a guiding principle for us, and it is with this in mind that we approached authors of several recent books targeted at young performers and their families who want to make a career out of show business. 

Family Support System Crucial for Child Actors

Where are they now? "Wonder Years" stars find success as adults. 

The new sitcom The Grinder marks the return of Fred Savage to the small screen. And while Fred is the best known child actor from the Wonder Years, all of our young friends from the late-80s dramedy went on to success in other acting ventures, on the other side of the camera, or away from show business altogether