What it Takes to be an On-set Teacher

What it Takes to be an On-set Teacher

What it Takes to be an On-Set Teacher

For the teacher with a creative soul who is searching for a different environment in which to enrich his or her skill, educating child actors in an on-set teaching situation is a viable, unique alternative.

"You really get to teach," said on-set teacher Sally Rusk in an interview with OLE. "You get to work with students one-on-one or in small groups so you learn your students’ strength, weaknesses and learning styles so you can get some great interactions going."

A Different Role: What it Takes to be a Studio Teacher

A Different Role: What it Takes to be a Studio Teacher

A Different Role: What it Takes to be a Studio Teacher

In a previous article, we discussed the role of an on-set teacher. For most of the country, on-set teachers are responsible for educating young performers while on location. But if you are in California, the role is referred to as a studio teacher, and goes well beyond the scope of an on-set teacher.

The studio teacher is more like a combined teacher and social worker, and the certification requires adherence to specific child labor laws that come into play on the set. A studio teacher must be present where there are minors in any entertainment arena, including film, TV, photography, recording, modeling, or even a rodeo or circus — anywhere where a child actor or entertainer of any sort is present and working.

Mastering the Art of Auditioning for the Young Actor

Mastering the Art of Auditioning for the Young Actor

Mastering the Art of Auditioning for the Young Actor

The audition process for many young actors can be stressful, but it can also be a freeing, fun learning experience. Really. While "getting the part" is the ultimate goal, parents and agents who mentor these young actors may find that altering that focus could make the child’s acting journey much more enjoyable and rewarding.

Acting Styles

Acting Styles

When it comes to choosing an acting style, there is no shortage of options. Fortunately, many of these techniques are well-established and widely acclaimed by some of the most well-known names in the industry. Whether you are a budding young performer or a veteran of stage and screen, you can always up your game by studying the principles of a legendary acting teacher.

Acting Styles: Konstantin Stanislavski’s System

Acting Styles: Konstantin Stanislavski’s System

Improv games are great as a training aid, a creative exercise, or just a fun diversion. And the good news is that actors can't lose at these games. As we discussed in our last article, improvisation mastery builds confidence, skill, versatility, and courage on stage, in front of the camera, and in auditions.

Improv is an invaluable tool, for any actor, but especially for young performers. Beginning in childhood, improv games help sharpen character development, creativity, and on-the-spot decision-making to a fine point. And they can be played just about anywhere at any time. Think about it: Fun and free. All work and all play. What’s not to love?

Here are a few tried-and-true improv game suggestions for your young performer:

Acting Styles: Lee Strasberg's Method

Acting Styles: Lee Strasberg's Method

“Method acting is what all actors have always done whenever they acted well.” ~ Lee Strasberg

Lee Strasberg (1901-1982), actor, director, and teacher, has been called the “Father of method acting in America.” His technique is based upon a system created by Konstantin Stanislavski, where actors strive for a realistic performance by utilizing their “emotional memories.”

Acting Styles: Sanford Meisner’s Technique

Acting Styles: Sanford Meisner’s Technique

"To be an interesting actor – hell, to be an interesting human being – you must be authentic and for you to be authentic you must embrace who you really are, warts and all." ~ Sanford Meisner

What do Michelle Pfeiffer, Tom Cruise, Stephen Colbert, Alec Baldwin, Diane Keaton, and Robert Duvall have in common? Besides being A-List actors and performers, they have all been trained in the Meisner technique, a specialized acting style that teaches students to “Live truthfully under imaginary circumstances.”

Improv Games for Young Actors

Improv Games for Young Actors

Improv games are great as a training aid, a creative exercise, or just a fun diversion. And the good news is that actors can't lose at these games. As we discussed in our last article, improvisation mastery builds confidence, skill, versatility, and courage on stage, in front of the camera, and in auditions.

Improv is an invaluable tool, for any actor, but especially for young performers. Beginning in childhood, improv games help sharpen character development, creativity, and on-the-spot decision-making to a fine point. And they can be played just about anywhere at any time. Think about it: Fun and free. All work and all play. What’s not to love?

Here are a few tried-and-true improv game suggestions for your young performer: